Catalogue of the Jewish Museum, R. D. Barnett, editor, London 1974 (47254)

First Edition

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Listing Details

Lot Number: 47254
Title (English): Catalogue of the Jewish Museum, London
Note: First Edition
Author: R. D. Barnett, editor
City: London
Publisher: Harvey Miller
Publication Date: 1974
Estimated Price: $200.00 USD - $500.00 USD
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Description

Physical Description:

First edition. xix, 414pp, index, bibliography, 700 illustrations, 19 in color. A very good copy bound in the original blue cloth boards with dust jacket. Includes 4 pp. corrigenda and addenda.

 

Detailed Description:   

Important and scarce reference book of a museum that contains over a thousand works of art. Among its works are a rich collection of ritual silver objects and synagogal embroidered textiles from English and European synagogues as well as early Palestinian artifacts.

The Jewish Museum was founded in 1932 by Professor Cecil Roth, Alfred Rubens and Wilfred Samuel. Originally located in Woburn House in Bloomsbury, it moved to an elegant early Victorian listed building in Camden Town in 1994.

The London Museum of Jewish Life was founded in 1983 as the Museum of the Jewish East End with the aim of rescuing and preserving the disappearing heritage of London's East End – the heartland of Jewish settlement in Britain. While the East End has remained an important focus, the Museum expanded to reflect the diverse roots and social history of Jewish people across London, including the experiences of refugees from Nazism. It also developed an acclaimed programme of Holocaust and anti-racist education.

In 1995 the two Museum's were amalgamated. Between 1995 and 2007 the combined Jewish Museum ran on two sites, but with a long term aim to find the means to combine the two collections, activities and displays within a single site.

Following years of planning and fundraising the museum bought a former piano factory behind the Camden Town site and raised the required funds to combine and remodel the buildings. The new Museum opened to the public on 17 March 2010.

 

Hebrew Description:   

 

Reference:   

http://www.jewishmuseum.org.uk/history-of-the-museum-new