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Halakhah le-Moshe; Eiruv ve-Hozu'ah, New York 1902; 1907

הלכה למשה; עירוב והוצאה - Only Editions

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Details
  • Lot Number 51552
  • Title (English) Halakhah le-Moshe; Eiruv ve-Hozu'ah
  • Title (Hebrew) הלכה למשה; עירוב והוצאה
  • Note Only Edition
  • Author R. Moshe Weinberger; R. Joshua b. Moses Joseph Siegel
  • City New York
  • Publisher דפוס יואל אראנסאן; Wolf Hirschprung; Isaac Rahlin
  • Publication Date 1902; 1907
  • Estimated Price - Low 200
  • Estimated Price - High 500

  • Item # 1971286
  • End Date
  • Start Date
Description

Physical Description

Two important works, only editions, in one volume. [13], (3)-74 pp. octavo, 196:126 mm., wide margins, light age staining.

[2], 54 pp., usual age staining, wide margins. Very good copies bound in contemporary boards, chipped.

 

Detail Description

Halakhah le-Moshe - Issued to permit the consumption of meat slaughtered by the United Dressed Beef Co. United's shohatim were fired in 1896 for refusing to work overtime prior to a holiday. R. Hillel haKohen Klein, who supervised United backed the shohatim, United subsequently fired the shohatim and hired replacements. As a result R. Klien forbid their meat. This volume was issued to support the striking shohatim.

R. Moshe Weinberger was born in Hungary in 1854 and studied under several noted Torah scholars, among them Rabbi Moshe Sofer (d. 1917, not to be confused with his name-sake, known as the Chasam Sofer), Rabbi Shmuel Ehrenfeld, Rabbi Elazar Loew, and Rabbi Meir Perles. In 1880, he was forced to leave Hungary for unknown reasons and came toNew York City.“Whatever those reasons may have been, New York was the wrong place for him. True, the city then already had an Orthodox Jewish population estimated to number 10,000 people. It housed an impressive Hungarian congregation, Ohab Zedek, founded in 1872/3,as well as several other Orthodox synagogues, most notably Beth Hamedrash Hagodol (1852,reor-ganized 1859), Beth Hamedrash Livne Yisroel Yelide Polen (1853,later the Kalvarier Shul) and Khal Adas Jeshurun (1856). But these synagogues lived in relative poverty; most lacked the money to support a full-time rabbi. And if any did want a rabbi, they had little trouble luring one with distinguished European credentials, reports of ritual laxity in America not withstanding.Thus, in spite of his impressive scholarly background and his staunch adherence to Orthodoxy, R Weinberger was unable to find a rabbinical position, so he made a number of unsuccessful forays into business. In 1890, he became the rabbi of Congregation Bnai Israel Anshei Ungarn of Scranton, Pennsylvania. In 1893, he moved to Philadelphia, where he became the rabbi of Congregation Ohev Shalom.

In 1895, R. Weinberger returned to New York to become the Rav of Congregation Beth HaMidrash HaGadol Anshei Ungarn. However, his relationship with his congregants was often contentious. They felt that he should devote himself to improving the image and fostering the growth of the shul, whereas he devoted himself to scholarship and education. Some were openly scornful of his efforts to found a high level yeshiva. Others felt that the congregation should move to a larger building, in an effort to attract new members.“If that meant discarding a few time-honored traditions, they were prepared to pay the price. For eleven years R. Weinberger kept his position, frequent quarrels and his own difficult economic plight not withstanding. In August 1905 a dispute caused him to cut back on his classes, and some time later an effort was made to have him fired. But he had a contract and held on, calling all the while for reconciliation. Then on the last day of Passover, April 17, 1906, accumulated tensions finally exploded. The Hungarian Congregation Beth Hamedrash Hagodol erupted in rioting and police had to be called to quell the disturbance. The incident that occasioned the violence was Rabbi Weinberger's entry into the matzah business. He claimed to need extra money. This divided the congregation (some congregants were in the matzah business themselves), led to catcalling during the rabbi’s Passover sermon, and finally resulted in blows being exchanged. In the aftermath, Rabbi Weinberger refused to resign his position, placed a ban on his synagogue, and never entered its premises again. Though later he sought reconciliation, he apparently spent his remaining years ‘in exile,’ producing matzah.

In 1895, Rabbi Weinberger returned to New York to become the Rov of Congregation Beth HaMidrash HaGadol Anshei Ungarn. However, his relation-ship with his congregants was often contentious. They felt that he should devote himself to improving the image and fostering the growth of the shul, whereas he devoted himself to scholarship and education. Some were openly scornful of his efforts to found a high level yeshiva. Others felt that the congregation should move to a larger building, in an effort to attract new members.“If that meant discarding a few time-honored traditions, they were prepared to pay the price. For eleven years R. Weinberger kept his position, frequent quarrels and his own difficult economic plight not withstanding. In August 1905 a dispute caused him to cut back on his classes, and some time later an effort was made to have him fired. But he had a contract and held on, calling all the while for reconciliation. Then on the last day of Passover, April 17, 1906, accumulated tensions finally exploded. The Hungarian Congregation Beth Hamedrash Hagodol erupted in rioting and police had to be called to quell the disturbance. The incident that occasioned the violence was Rabbi Weinberger's entry into the matzah business. He claimed to need extra money. This divided the congregation (some congregants were in the matzah business themselves), led to catcalling during the rabbi’s Passover sermon, and finally resulted in blows being exchanged. In the aftermath, Rabbi Weinberger refused to resign his position, placed a ban on his synagogue, and never entered its premises again. Though later he sought reconciliation, he apparently spent his remaining years ‘in exile,’ producing matzah.

R. Weinberger, while serving as a rabbi, repeatedly supported shochatim against charges of unfitness seemingly motivated more by personal and economic factors than by religious ones.  In 1887, Weinberger published his first and most controversial book, HaYehudim v’ha-Yahadut b’New York. Written in Hebrew and directed to his brethren in Europe, Weinberger scorned American society as materialistic, sorely lacking in appropriate family values, and a spiritual danger to religious Jews. Contemptuous of Jewish life in America, as well, Weinberger cautioned his former countrymen about the poor standards of kashruth and Jewish education and the low level of Talmud knowledge of Jewry’s religious functionaries. He lamented America's magnificent synagogues, which some Jews felt compelled to build, and chided Jews for the extravagance of luring cantors with inflated salaries to fill normally empty synagogue pews. His other writings include Kuntres Halachah l’Moshe (Philadelphia, 1894); Rosh Divrei Moshe (Philadelphia, 1895); Ho’il Moshe (New York, 1895); Halachah l’Moshe (New York,1902); Divrei Shalom v’Emet (NewYork, 1908); Igeret Mishneh: An Open Letter to the Beth Hamidrash Hagadol (New York,1909); Darosh Dorash Moshe(New York, 1914); HaMe’asef 9:2(1904), p. 20b; HaMe’asef 9:4(1904),p.46b.He also published several articles in HaIvri. Rav Moshe Weinberger passed away in Brooklyn, New York, on June 13/7 Sivan 1940, survived by his wife, four daughters, and two sons. He is buried in the Union Field Cemetery in Ridgewood, New York, not far from the grave of Rabbi Yaakov Yosef, the Chief Rabbi.

Eiruv ve-Hozu'ah - Responsa with maps permitting the carrying in public streets in Manhattan on the Sabbath. This responsa generated numerous rebuttals and polemics.

R. Joshua b. Moses Joseph Siegel (1846-1910) was born in Kuczbork a suburb of Plotsk, Poland. He was educated in major European Yeshivot and immigrated to the United States in 1884 where he settled in New York, officiated and wrote responsa. A volume of his responsa, Oznei Joshua (Jerusalem 1914), was published after his demise.

 

Hebrew Description

... הלכה למשה - כולל פס"ד ומו"מ של הלכה בענין השגת גבול ויורד לאומנותו של חברו, וביאור רחב בענין כח בי"ד לאסור את המותר ולקנוס שלא כדין ... מאתי משה וויינבערגער, רב ואב"ד בבית המדרש הגדול אנשי אונגארן בנויארק. מחברת א.

בשער התאריך: תרס"ב. תאריכי המכתבים: התחלת תרס"ג.

מכתבי רבנים, רובם מהונגאריה, אודות שוחט שיצאה טריפה מתחת ידו, מה דינו. המכתבים נשלחו אל הרב וויינברגר.

הכותבים: ר’ שלום אלחנן יפה, נוא יארק, ו לפרשת נח תרס"ג;

ר’ אליעזר דייטש, באניהאד, א לפרשת נח תרס"ג;

ר’ יהודא אלטמאן, טשאטה, פרשת ואתחנן תרס"ב;

ר’ נפתלי הכהן ביין, לעמעש, ג לפרשת חיי שרה תרס"ג.

עירוב והוצאה - את... ר' יהושע סיגעל נ"י, אשר חשף... בכחא דהיתרא... היתר הטלטול בש"ק בקצת חלק המזרחי דעיר נויארק... ונוסף לזה תשובות... מאת גאוני זמננו... ומסכימים ... לדעת... המחבר... הובא לביה"ד ע"י ... זאב וואלף במוהר"ר מרדכי ז"ל הירשפרונג מקראקא... <p>קולופון: "מעמוד 27 והלאה נדפס בדפוס יצחק רחלין ושותפיו".

 

Reference:

From an article by Dr. Yitzchok Levine, Professor, Department of MathematicalSciences at Stevens Institute ofTechnology in Hoboken, N.J. (HAMODIA, AUGUST 6, 2008); Kevarim.com; Bibliography of the Hebrew Book 1470-1960 #000325518; HPA #1122

Bibliography of the Hebrew Book 1470-1960 #000153977; Deinard 636 (refers to the Author as a Yankee Doodle)