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Mesillat Yesharim, R. Moses Hayyim Luzzatto (Ramhal), Vilna 1854

מסלת ישרים - First Yiddish Edition

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Details
  • Lot Number 51806
  • Title (English) Mesillat Yesharim
  • Title (Hebrew) מסלת ישרים
  • Author R. Moses Hayyim Luzzatto (Ramhal)
  • City Vilna
  • Publisher דפוס יוסף ראובן ראם
  • Publication Date 1854
  • Estimated Price - Low 200
  • Estimated Price - High 500

  • Item # 2030205
  • End Date
  • Start Date
Description

Physical Description

First edition with Yiddish translation, 126 ff., octavo, 188:110 mm., light age staining, nice margins. A good copy bound in contemporary quarter leather over boards, rubbed.

First Yiddish Edition

 

Detail Description

Classical ethical work by R. Moses Hayyim Luzzatto (Ramhal, 1707–1746), Mesillat Yesharim. It was so highly regarded by the Vilna Gaon, (Gr”a) that, that he wrote that if Luzzatto were alive in his generation, he would go to him, from Vilna to Italy, by foot, in order to sit at his feet and learn from him. Gr”a stated that R. Luzzato had a greater understanding of the tenets of Judaism than could be attained by any other mortal.

R. Moses Hayyim Luzzatto (Ramhal, 1707–1746) was a kabbalist, writer of ethical works, and Hebrew poet; leader of a group of religious thinkers, who were mainly interested in the problems of redemption and messianism. R. Luzzatto was born in Padua, Italy, into one of the most important, oldest, and most respectable families in Italian Jewry. Regarded as a genius from childhood, he knew Bible, Talmud, Midrash, halakhic literature, and classical languages and literature thoroughly. While he was immersed in kabbalistic speculations, he suddenly heard a divine voice, which he believed to be that of a maggid (i.e., a divine power inclined to reveal heavenly secrets to human beings). From that moment, the Maggid spoke to Luzzatto frequently and he noted these revelations, which comprised his kabbalistic writings for a few years.

 

Hebrew Description

... האבן מיר אויף עברי דייטש גטאן איבער זעצן...

שונה מן התרגום ליידיש שנדפס בווארשא תרט"ו.

 

References

BE mem 2572; EJ; Bibliography of the Hebrew Book 1470-1960 #000143458